Olive Squalane, anyone?

Spotlight on Olive Squalane

Olive oil was prized for its flavor and its healing properties by the ancients; in fact, olive oil is still spoken of with reverence in the mediterranean. Some years ago, I visited an olive grower in the Chianti region of Italy whose family had been in the business since the 15th century. He told me that if the babies were sick, they would bathe them in the purest olive oil. And even if they were healthy, they would still get preventative baths on occasion. Modern research tells us that olive oil is beneficial for gallbladder and liver, and is a general tonic for the nerves. It is soothing to mucous membranes and is said to help dissolve cholesterol deposits. It is about 73 percent oleic acid, one of the two fatty acids that make up the phospholipids that form cerebral and nervous tissue, so olive oil positively affects cerebral growth in babies. It has the same linolenic acid concentration as breast milk, and it favors the mineralization and development of bones, helping to fight osteoporosis.

Olive oil also contains at least four different antioxidants, which can help neutralize damaging free radicals that can lead to skin aging and skin cancer. It contains squalene, which is an amazing immune enhancer, helping to protect the body against bacterial, viral, and fungal infections.

Which brings us to the matter of Squalane. What is it? And why does it do?

The natural lubricant that human sebaceous glands secret, sebum, is comprised of squalane, wax and other oils. Recent research shows that our sebum acts as a delivery system for antioxidants, antimicrobials, hydration, as well as pheromones. (So don’t worry if you’re a little greasy, someone might find you attractive anyhow.) Specifically, natural human squalane is a key component for maintaining the epidermal skin barrier and unfortunately as we age, that content naturally decreases.

Since olive squalane is not an irritant at concentrations, and is already an element in our skin hydration system, it works wonderfully as a source of moisture. And a little goes a long long way as this oil is pure & concentrated which means every drop is highly potent. It can be used for moisturizing, UV protection, anti-aging, skin smoothing (make-up glides beautifully over it), has some anti fungal abilities & above all it quickly dries to a lovely barely there finish.

Stock up on NO EVIL and NOURISH & REPLENISH to get your squalene fix!

Add a bit of olive oil to your next warm bath for a good healthy Italian-style soak.

{Photo by a dear friend who is one of the world’s finest photographers: David Tosti}

 

 

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